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How to write a journal

The practice of keeping a journal is very important. It’s a way to remember dreams and events that happen in waking life. Recording memories is a way to honor them. The more you write, the better it gets. Patterns will become more apparent and your ability to analyze events and symbols will improve with time. These are my tips on how to journal.

Journal about dreams

When you wake up, write keywords to things you remember dreaming of. This is a quick process that allows you to document what was happening before dreams slip away. The order of this isn’t important, because you can organize all your thoughts when you’re writing the content. Depending on the circumstances, you can also use your phone to jot down a note or record your voice. When you’re ready to, write down everything that you remember from your dreams. Important things to acknowledge are any emotions that you felt in the dream, people and animals, symbols that stand out and whether anything relates to the reality of your life (for example: if your work place in the dream looks like your work place or if it is remarkably different). Give your dream a strong and vibrant title.

Journal about life

Take time before going to sleep to write about your day. This is a way to document important events, plus it’s a good way to vent about things to fall asleep easier. This can be short or long, depending on your comfort level or how busy you are. I like journalism as a sort of self-help process. The best journalism is when there’s trust and you don’t hold anything back. Just let it flow. Consider if you need to write when you’re alone or if you need a special place for your book. Give a strong and vibrant title to your writings about the day.

figure-in-hammock

 

How to write a journal

Now that you have some content, I can help you organize your book a bit better. Write your dreams and experiences on the right side of the pages and number them. I realize this might seem wasteful, but I’ll explain why later. Make sure each one has a title and date. In the front of the book, reserve a few pages for a table of contents. In time this will help you locate them if you want to reminisce or find one for a particular reason.

Write about precognitive dreams

This is when the magic happens! You’ve been doing wonderfully in paying attention to what happens in your life and documenting it. At some point there will come a moment in life when you realize how a dream relates to life. This can be literal or symbolic.

One of my favorite precognitive experiences was when I saw a sailboat with a huge white sail with a blue star on it. It was so beautiful. It was dancing in the wind and I heard the waves of the ocean. The next day I was watching Failure to Launch. There was a scene in which Matthew McConaughey’s character takes a woman on a date on his sailboat and he unfurls this beautiful sail into the wind. It was the same sailboat from my dream!  

When I come across these, I write them on the left side of the pages, next to the dreams that they relate to. The number of the page is inbetween two whole numbers, so it becomes # 1/2 (for example 5 1/2). I love recording these magical moments!

Another good thing to realize is that anything in the future is changeable. When I wake up with a scary dream of something that I think is a future event, I feel grateful. I scan all the elements of the dream to find out where and when it occurs, as well as knowing who is with me. This gives me information and the ability to find a road in which negative events can be avoided.

Journaling will be a very rewarding practice

Knowing how to journal in this full way of both night time and day time experiences is quite rewarding. It doesn’t take very long to see results of how dreams interact with life and vice versa. You’ll become more awake and notice more things around you. Whatever you are seeking will also seek you. Let’s become like the Ojubwa who also included dream stories when telling the major events of their lives.

Photo: Figure in Hammock by John Singer Sargent

Jolene Gentry

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